Including job reduction.

Alcohol misuse is a significant concern for reservists returning home Returning national guardsmen much more likely to turn to alcoholic beverages than general public when faced with issues in the home, according to new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine Irrespective of traumatic events experienced during deployment, returning National Guard soldiers were more likely to build up a drinking problem in the event that faced with civilian life setbacks, including job reduction, legal problems, divorce, and serious legal and financial complications – all commonplace in military families. Results of the analysis by experts at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Wellness are published online in the American Journal of Preventive Medication.In the aftermath of the recent scandals involving fake peer reviewers, many journals are determined to carefully turn off the reviewer-suggestion option on their manuscript-submission systems. But that move may not be enough, as the publisher Hindawi discovered this past spring. Although Hindawi doesn’t let authors suggest reviewers for their manuscripts, it decided to examine the peer-review records for manuscripts submitted in 2013 and 2014 for possible fraud. The peer-review procedure found in Hindawi’s journals depends generally on the expertise of its editorial board members and the guest editors of special issues, who are responsible for supervising the review of submitted manuscripts.5 Because the peer reviewers selected by the guest editors were not subject to any sort of independent verification, editors themselves could undermine the process in quite similar way that authors or third-party agencies did somewhere else: by creating fake reviewer identities and addresses from which they submitted reviews that are positive endorsing publication.